£300k-a-year NHS chief quits job with letter to staff complaining ‘life’s too short’

£300k-a-year NHS chief quits job with letter to staff complaining ‘life’s too short’

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AN NHS boss quit her £300,000-a-year job, complaining “life is too short”.

Siobhan McArdle resigned as chief executive at the South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Middlesbrough, emailing workers to say the personal “cost” was “too high”.

NHS

Siobhan McArdle resigned as chief executive from the NHS trust claiming ‘life is too short’[/caption]

Ms McArdle resigned after saying the personal cost of the £300,000 job was too high

She cited a”challenging” working environment at the trust, which looks after 1.5 million patients, and joked about becoming a football manager.

Ms McArdle said: “I have always done my utmost to defend and promote the interests of our organisation.

“And I have done so within a very challenging financial and regulatory environment, in a local health economy that I believe is underfunded and unsustainable.

“Throughout my time in the NHS I am proud to have remained true to my own values, vision and high levels of integrity – values, vision and integrity that I know many of you also share.”

‘PERSON COST TOO HIGH’

She added: “However, after much debate with my family and friends over the last 12 months, I have now decided that the personal cost of being a CEO in the NHS is just too high and life is just too short.”

Ms McArdle joined the trust in April, 2015, before becoming CEO in September, 2015.

This year, a Care Quality Commission inspection found the trust needs improvement.

Senior managers “were not visible, contactable or approachable”, the commission’s report found.

RESIGNATION LETTER IN FULL

    Hello everyone,
    Following the latest round of financial forecasting and re-forecasting and what I consider to be too great a challenge with regard to the delivery of further productivity and efficiency savings at South Tees Foundation Trust, I am writing to let you know that I have decided to step down as CEO effective from 30 September 2019.
    As many of you know, I joined the trust as director of transformation in April 2015 and shortly after that became a CEO in the following September, something which was certainly not in my career plan at the time. I think it is fair to say, given my reputation for straight speaking, I have lasted far longer than anyone, including me, thought I would – in fact I have exceeded the average term of office of three years for newly appointed CEOs in the NHS by a year and so I am now obviously considering a career in football management as my next move.
    I have always done my utmost to defend and promote the interests of our organisation, and I have done so within a very challenging financial and regulatory environment, in a local health economy that I believe is underfunded and unsustainable. Throughout my time in the NHS I am proud to have remained true to my own values, vision and high levels of integrity – values, vision and integrity that I know many of you also share. However, after much debate with my family and friends over the last 12 months, I have now decided that the personal cost of being a CEO in the NHS is just too high and life is just too short.
    South Tees Foundation Trust is a fantastic organisation made up of passionate people who have a great reputation for delivering excellence in patient outcomes and experiences. Although there is always room for improvement in an organisation of its size, South Tees is not an organisation that requires improvement. South Tees is also financially unsustainable without a much needed long-term financial recovery plan. A plan which not only addresses the shortcomings of our PFI contract but also deals with the burden of long-term debt that has built up over many years, and resolves the urgent need for capital investment. This is something the senior leadership team and myself have been fighting continuously for over the last four years.
    We can all take both pride and satisfaction in having delivered a recovery plan totalling more than £140m over the last five years which has demonstrated that as an organisation we were and are prepared to deliver innovative change and improved efficiency whilst at the same time maintaining patient safety – we now however need to see real transformational change at a system wide level in order to make any further progress.
    I hope you all know that I have absolutely given it my all over the last four years and have had a great time at South Tees, reconnecting with lots of old friends whilst also making many, many new ones. I will always remain a great supporter of this organisation and fully intend to continue to fight for a fairer deal for the people of Teeside, Hambleton, Richmondshire, Whitby and the surrounding areas – just from a very different place.
    My final request would be that everyone now gets behind the board and senior leadership team. The board and senior leadership team may not always get it right, but I can assure you they work tirelessly on behalf of the organisation, its patients and its people, often at great personal cost to themselves and their families, as of course do many of you.
    So my final ask is that everyone now pulls together and sticks together to ensure we get the fair deal South Tees Foundation Trust and our population deserves.
    Siobhan

In her resignation letter Ms McArdle claimed South Tees is “not an organisation that requires improvement”.

Medical news publication The Health Service Journal also found the trust, which has 9,000 workers, was £4.4million behind plan.

It said the trust wasn’t hitting A&E targets, with referral to treatment and cancer waiting times also criticised.

Ms McAardle said the trust was “underfunded” and “financially unsustainable”.


The trust’s 2018/19 report showed Ms McArdle earned between £290,000 and £295,000.

Alan Downey, chair of the trust, said bosses were “sorry” Ms McArdle  had resigned.

He said: “However, we completely understand that, after more than four years of giving her all to the organisation, she feels now is the right time to move on to new challenges and opportunities.”

North News and Pictures

Ms McArdle emailed staff to say she was resigning[/caption]

 


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